horse chestnut

Pharmacy name: horse chestnut seeds – Hippocastani semen (formerly: Semen Hippocastani), horse chestnut flowers – Hippocastani flos (formerly: Flores Hippocastani), horse chestnut leaves – Hippocastani folium (formerly: Folia Hippocastani), horse chestnut bark – ippocastani cortex (formerly : Cortex Hippocastani).

Botanical description.It is rather meaningless to describe the chestnut tree, familiar to both children and adults, because it gives us joy three times a year: in early spring, when its large buds swell with the onset of warm weather, in May, when we are delighted with the amazing candles of its flowers, and, finally , in autumn, when its brilliant reddish-brown seeds – interesting child’s play – fall from the trees. There are chestnut trees in almost every locality. This ornamental tree can be found near houses, in gardens, near all kinds of structures, in parks and alleys. However, horse chestnut first entered Central Europe only in the second half of the 16th century from northern Greece. Its seeds, traditionally called chestnuts, from the very beginning found a very diverse application: as feed raw materials, as a source of starch, as a material for winter feeding of livestock. Besides, in folk superstitions, they were used to prevent all kinds of diseases, while it was supposed to carry three chestnuts in your pocket. The use of chestnuts for medicinal purposes has also been known for a long time, but its medicinal effect was first discovered only in 1896. Active ingredients of seeds: chestnut saponin (escin), tannins, flavonol glycosides. In the bark, flowers and leaves, these substances are also contained in significant quantities. Many other concomitant substances not listed here are also involved in the overall medicinal effect. chestnut saponin (escin), tannins, flavonol glycosides. In the bark, flowers and leaves, these substances are also contained in significant quantities. Many other concomitant substances not listed here are also involved in the overall medicinal effect. chestnut saponin (escin), tannins, flavonol glycosides. In the bark, flowers and leaves, these substances are also contained in significant quantities. Many other concomitant substances not listed here are also involved in the overall medicinal effect.

Healing action and application. One French doctor, interested in the use of chestnuts in folk medicine, prepared a tincture from them and successfully applied it in the treatment of hemorrhoids (1896). Later, its effect on the entire vascular system, especially the venous system, was revealed. The anti-edematous and anti-inflammatory effects of horse chestnut have expanded the scope of its application. However, horse chestnut seed tea cannot be drunk; bark, leaves or flowers are used for this. Numerous drugs in the form of ointments, drops, tablets, capsules, suppositories, even injectable products are currently used as vascular agents. The need for them in our time is great, because due to general physical inactivity, the number of vascular diseases increases. Therefore, medicines from this plant are of real value.

Use in homeopathy. The homeopathic product Acsculus hippocastanum is prepared from fresh, peeled seeds. The agent is used in dilutions from D 1 to D 1 and is given 2-3 times every day, several drops: with dry catarrh of the nasopharynx, with hemorrhoidal and trophic ulcers of the leg.

Application in folk medicine. A tincture of flowers, bark or leaves, sometimes used in folk medicine, is prepared on the basis of wheat vodka. It is used against diseases of the veins and for rheumatic complaints. They also try to take it for stomach and intestinal pains. In some cases, chestnuts are roasted, then crushed, mixed with flour and vinegar, and this mushy mixture is placed on the hardened breasts of nursing mothers to soften it. However, there is no serious need for this, since there are many ready-made horse chestnut products in pharmacies that can be used, mainly for vein diseases.

  • Tea from horse chestnut leaves as a good cough remedy: 1 teaspoon with the top of the leaves is poured into 1/4 liter of boiling water and infused for 10 minutes. Drink with honey (excluding diabetics!).

Side effects. If tea and other horse chestnut products are taken as prescribed by a doctor or as directed on the package, no side effects should be feared.

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