Gauls

Botanical description. Outwardly, the galls look like spherical formations with a diameter of 1.5 to 2.5 cm. These pathological growths of cells on the leaves and shoots of the “gall” infectious oak (Quercus infectoria Oliv.) appear after the laying of eggs by the oak-leaved gall washer (Cynips tinctoria). Quercuf infectoria is native to Asia Minor and Mesopotamia. Galls formed on it (“ink nuts”) are collected in August-September.

active ingredients. Gall nuts contain up to 70% tannin, a mixture of tannins.

Application. Previously, galls (a tincture traditionally prepared from them) were used for rinsing and irrigating the oral cavity with inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth and throat, for lubricating and cauterizing frostbitten places, and not often inside from diarrhea. Basically, galls serve as a source of tannins and are used in the manufacture of ink and dyeing.

Botanical description. Outwardly, the galls look like spherical formations with a diameter of 1.5 to 2.5 cm. These pathological growths of cells on the leaves and shoots of the “gall” infectious oak (Quercus infectoria Oliv.) appear after the laying of eggs by the oak-leaved gall washer (Cynips tinctoria). Quercuf infectoria is native to Asia Minor and Mesopotamia. Galls formed on it (“ink nuts”) are collected in August-September.

active ingredients. Gall nuts contain up to 70% tannin, a mixture of tannins.

Application. Previously, galls (a tincture traditionally prepared from them) were used for rinsing and irrigating the oral cavity with inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth and throat, for lubricating and cauterizing frostbitten places, and not often inside from diarrhea. Basically, galls serve as a source of tannins and are used in the manufacture of ink and dyeing.

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